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setting graphic organizers

Setting Graphic Organizers: Free & Differentiated

Just like studying the characters is not just finding out the names of the characters, studying the setting is not just determining the time and place. Today’s blog post is about three types of setting graphic organizers with different levels of support for differentiation.

In previous posts, I shared some slides, worksheets, and task cards to teach and study the setting of a story.

Click here to get a freebie of the setting graphic organizers mentioned in this post.

Purchase the graphic organizers in my store by clicking here.

Setting Graphic Oraganizers for Fiction With Low Text Complexity

My third graders love drawing, but we only have art class once a week! Therefore, I always try to incorporate drawing into my lessons when it can be helpful.

In this graphic organizer, students first read a story of their choice. Then they are going to close their eyes and visualize where and when the story happens. Next, they need to draw their mental image in the box. Finally, there are two questions for them to answer: 1. What is the setting of the story? 2. What details did the author use to describe the setting of the story? 

setting graphic organizer with drawing

With the help of the drawing, it becomes much easier for the students to answer the two questions.

However, since in some texts, the setting changes over time, this graphic organizer is better for low-level texts (F&P Level below E) with low text complexity or for book excerpts.

Setting Graphic Oraganizers for Fiction With Intermediate Text Complexity

This graphic organizer is for stories with intermediate reading levels (F&P Level F-M). It asks the students 3 questions: 

1. What is the setting of the story? (If the story has more than one setting, ask the students to write about the main setting).

2. What details did the author use to describe the setting of the story? 

3. How does the setting affect the characters’ actions and feelings in the story?

setting graphic organizer three questions

So students who read between F&P Level F and M should focus more on identifying text details the author used to describe the main setting. Besides, we can push them to think about why the author used these details and how the setting affects the characters’ actions and feelings in the story.

Setting Graphic Oraganizers for Fiction With High Text Complexity

The last graphic organizer is developed based on the second one, but it asks for more details and has two higher-order thinking questions: 1. Why did the author use these details to describe the setting? 2. How does the setting affect the characters’ actions and feelings in the story?

setting graphic organizer with four questions

If a student is reading above F&P Level M, you should definitely push him/her to think deeper about the setting of a story. It will help them with their narrative writing as well.

In conclusion, from the first graphic organizer to the last one, students are provided with less and less support but required to think more and deeper. You may use these graphic organizers together for different groups in one lesson. Or you may use them as a progression for the same group of students.

If you want some texts to go with these graphic organizers, you may check out the Setting Worksheets blog to get the freebie or purchase the product.

In addition, there is also a free ppt mini-lesson and some differentiated task cards available if you are interested.

setting task cards
Differentiated Setting Task Cards
setting differentiated worksheets
Free & Differentiated Setting Worksheets
setting mini-lesson slides
Free Setting Mini-Lesson Slides
Setting mega bundle

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Best,

Ingrid

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